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title pic Barong Tagalog for a Groom’s Attire

Posted by admin on July 10, 2012

As they always say, it’s the “Bride’s Day” and she gets undivided attention once she walks down the aisle.    Not wanting to sound like a voice of discrimination but it’s supposed to be a team.

The focus of attention should be given as well to a groom.  The groom must also be given the kind of attention in a wedding day.   In order for this to happen, perhaps the groom must also be equally conscious of his looks and what he wears.

One gets to notice that in most wedding scenarios the groom prefers to wear a colored suit or tuxedo.  Be it the color of black, blue, grey, white, etc.  Admittedly, it makes the groom look smart and somewhat sophisticated.

However, does the attire look appropriate and comfortable considering that the country is of the tropical kind of climate?   I can just imagine the heat and the sweat the individual is experiencing at that moment.

On an occasion such as a wedding day the groom must look cool, comfortable, formal and smart and so it is just right to come up with a perfect wear to attract the deserved attention of the crowd.

In a Philippine setting, the best attire for the groom to complement the bride’s realm of wedding gown is no other than the Barong Tagalog.    It is the country’s male formal dress as it portrays the individual’s nationalism also.   Just perfect for the groom.

The textures of the Barong Tagalog are made of banana fiber or pineapple fiber featuring hand embroidered designs.     A Barong will look good on a groom when it is matched with a dark colored pant.

As they are made of thin fabric and material it is therefore cool and just appropriate in a warm temperature.  Even foreign nationals wear it as it is appropriate to our climate.

Needless to say, a groom wearing the Barong Tagalog shows the individual’s nationalistic character.  Donning it boasts of a rich and ancient craft, hence an élan and a legacy as it is worn.

Wearing a national formal dress nothing can go wrong with the groom.

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title pic Filipino-Themed Weddings Must Haves

Posted by admin on July 2, 2012

Philippine Wedding Cathedral

Philippine Wedding Cathedral

Most Filipino couples dream of the wedding at Manila Cathedral or any other historical churches or basilicas in the country that’s oozing with culture. But the location shouldn’t be the only thing that couples can do to have a sense of heritage on their wedding day: the key is to have that Filipino-look too. And here’s how:

Flowers can do magic when it comes to setting up an ambiance. The Philippines is home to many flowers that boast with beauty and aroma. Decorate the church with sweet-smelling Sampaguita or Ylang-Ylang, turn a simple reception hall into a garden filled with Gumamela and Waling-Waling, also known as the Queen of Philippine Orchid and make a bouquet out of Everlasting Flowers that symbolizes a love that lasts a lifetime, the native flowers wouldn’t only turn the ceremony into all-Filipino, it will also make the event seem like paradise.

The attire shouldn’t be left out from the theme as well. The Philippine national costume Barong Tagalog and the Baro’t Saya (Filipiniana) are world-class designs being praised by many fashion experts abroad. The simplicity and gentleness of the men’s barong paired with the femininity of the Filipiniana reveals more than beauty but also a rich and flourishing culture.

A wedding’s playlist is also very important in setting a mood and theme. To capture the very essence of the Filipino culture, choose to play all Original Pilipino Music (OPM) not only during the ceremony, but even at the reception. Playing both classics and latest Filipino songs would surely make the guests appreciate and grasp the wedding’s theme.

And lastly, every effort would not count if the food doesn’t complement the theme. Filipinos are foodies by nature. They enjoy a good meal and expect one during major events such as wedding. Be sure to get a Filipino food expert caterer that will serve more than Lechon and Bangus, but someone who can imprint the country’s history through every dish he serves.

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